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Shibani PatiShibani Pati, MD, PhD

Current Positions:

  • Scientific Director of Cellular Therapeutics, BSRI and Blood Systems Inc.
  • Assistant Investigator, BSRI
  • Assistant Adjunct Professor, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Surgery, University of California San Francisco

 

Contact Information:
270 Masonic Ave.
San Francisco, CA 94118
Phone: (415) 354-1383
Fax: (415) 567-5899
Email: spati@bloodsystems.org

 

Download a scientific summary [pdf file]

Download a curriculum vitae [pdf file]

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Education:

  • A.B., Molecular Biology, Princeton University
  • M. D., University of Maryland School of Medicine; Baltimore
  • Ph.D., University of Maryland School of Medicine; Baltimore

Training:

  • Postodoctoral Fellowship, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, Institute of Human Virology, Drs Marvin Reitz and Robert Gallo’s Laboratory, 2002-2005.
  • Vivian Smith Postdoctoral Fellowship in Neuroscience Baylor College of Medicine Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and University of Texas, Houston, Texas, Dr. Pramod Dash’s Laboratory, 2006-2008

Appointments:

  • Assistant Investigator, Blood Systems Research Institute
  • Assistant Professor, UCSF

Research Interests:

  • Stem cell therapeutics in trauma
  • Control of vascular leak in disease and mitigating endothelial damage
  • Novel Resuscitative Modalities
  • Storage Lesion of FFP

Current research:

I am a vascular biologist with an interest in the role of endothelial dysfunction and vascular compromise in the pathogenesis of human disease. My specific areas of investigation involve the use of stem cells and novel resuscitative modalities that can mitigate endothelial dysfunction in traumatic injury.

Abnormalities in vascular permeability leading to inflammation, tissue edema, and end-organ dysfunction significantly contribute to the morbidity and mortality associated with a number of human disease processes. For example, although a number of factors contribute to the high mortality and morbidity associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), the development of cerebral edema with brain swelling remains one of the most significant predictors of outcome. Similarly both hemorrhagic shock and septic shock are characterized by abnormal vascular permeability, which contributes to the development of shock-associated acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Despite the clear importance of abnormal vascular permeability in a number of human disease processes, there exists no therapeutic modality in current use to attenuate it.

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Selected Publications:

  1. Menge T, Zhao Y, Zhao J, Wataha, K, Gerber M, Zhang J, Letourneau P, Redell J, Shen L, Wang J, Peng Z, Xue H, Kozar R, Cox CS Jr, Khakoo AY, Holcomb JB, Dash PK, Pati S. Mesenchymal stem cells regulate blood-brain barrier integrity through TIMP3 release after traumatic brain injury. Sci Transl Med;4: 161ra50.
  2. P Letourneau, T Menge, K Wataha, C Wade, CS Cox Jr, JB Holcomb, S Pati. Human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells regulate leukocyte-endothelial interactions and activation of transcription factor NF-kappa B. Journal of Tissue Sci and Engineering. S3:001.
  3. Pati S, Gerber MH, Menge TD, Wataha KA, Zhao Y, Baumgartner JA, Zhao J, Letourneau PA, Huby MP, Baer LA, Salsbury JR, Kozar RA, Wade CE, Walker PA, Dash PK, Cox CS Jr, Doursout MF, Holcomb JB. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibit inflammation and preserve vascular endothelial integrity in the lungs after hemorrhagic shock. PLoS One. 2011;6(9):e25171. Epub 2011 Sep 28 PMID: 21980392
  4. Pati S*., Rogers, T, Khakoo, AY, Lederer, J. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Stimulate Protective Genetic Programming of Injured Cardiac Ventricular Myocytes. Journal of Mol. And Cell. Cardiology 2010
    * Indicates Co-first author
  5. Pati S, Khakoo AY, Zhao J, Jimenez F, Gerber M, Harting MT, Redell JB, Grill RJ, Matsuo Y, Guha S, Cox CS, Reitz MS, Holcomb JB, Dash PK. Human mesenchymal stem cells inhibit vascular permeability by modulating VE-cadherin/beta-catenin signaling. Stem Cells Dev. 2010 May 6. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 20446815
  6. Pati S, Matijevic N, Doursout MF, Ko T, Cao Y, Deng X, Kozar RA, Hartwell E, Conyers J, Holcomb JB. Protective effects of fresh frozen plasma on vascular endothelial permeability, coagulation, and resuscitation after hemorrhagic shock are time dependent and diminish between days 0 and 5 after thaw. J of Trauma. 2010 Jul;69 Suppl 1:S55-63. PMID: 20622621
  7. Pati S.*, Khakoo AY., Anderson SA., Reid W., Elshal MF., Rovira II, Nguyen AT., Malide D., Combs CA., Hall G., Zhang J., Raffeld M., Rogers TB., Stetler-Stevenson W., Franks JA., Reitz M., Finkel T. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells exert potent antitumorigenic effects in a model of Kaposi’s Sarcoma. J. Exp. Med. 2006 May 15;203(5):1235-47. *Indicates Co-first author

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