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Mark SeielstadMark Seielstad, PhD

Current Positions:

  • Associate Investigator, BSRI
  • Professor, Institute for Human Genetics and Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
  • Adjunct Investigator, Genome Institute of Singapore

Contact Information:
270 Masonic Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94118
Phone: (415) 354-1372
Fax: (415) 901-0733
Email: Mark.Seielstad@ucsf.edu
Links: http://humgen.medschool.ucsf.edu/faculty/seielstad-mark-phd

Download a scientific summary [pdf file]

Download a curriculum vitae [pdf file]

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Education:

  • B.S., with Honors, Biological Sciences, Stanford University, California
  • A.B., Classical Studies, Stanford University, California
  • Ph.D., Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Research Interests:

  • Identifying human genetic variation altering risk of disease - especially susceptibility to infectious diseases, autoimmunity, and metabolic diseases (i.e., Type 2 Diabetes).
  • High-Throughput genomic technologies, especially DNA sequencing and SNP genotyping.
  • Anthropological and population genetics, applied to questions of modern human origins and subsequent migrations and local adaptations.

Background:

For the last decade, Mark Seielstad, Ph.D., has been at the forefront of research in human and medical genetics and genetic epidemiology. While a postdoctoral fellow and, later, a faculty member at the Harvard School of Public Health, Dr. Seielstad accomplished a transition from the anthropological and evolutionary genetics of his doctoral training to the related field of medical genetics and genetic epidemiology. This led to a nearly 8 year stint at the Genome Institute of Singapore, where he rose to become the Senior Group Leader and Associate Director of Human Genetics. While there, he built and ran a high-throughput genomics and computational lab centered on the genome-wide genotyping and analysis of SNP variation as it relates to common, primarily immune-related diseases of importance to public health. Now at BSRI in San Francisco, Dr. Seielstad continues his search for human genetic variation that alters susceptibility to and outcomes of infections caused by pathogens of importance to the blood supply. Additional efforts aim to gain insight into the genetic causes of pregnancy and transfusion related alloimmunization. A third research initiative seeks to address a wide variety of other genetic questions of health and disease that are inherently answerable in large cohorts of blood donors and recipients.

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Publications:

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